Showing all 11 results

Select options

Chinese Five Spice

$10.25$27.75
(Based on 1 review)

This classic Chinese blend combines the flavors of sweet, salty, sour, bitter and pungent, to nourish and satisfy. Some say the name refers to the five elements – wood, fire, earth, metal, and water – needed to restore balance. Use as dry rub for proteins and starches, add to stir fries or soups, rice dishes and marinades.

 

Hand blended in small batches with: cinnamon, star anise, fennel, Sichuan pepper, and clove.

Select options
Select options

Cinnamon ~ Indonesian Cassia

$8.00$21.60

The Greek poet, Sappho, referenced Cassia in 7th century B.C. Though not the “true” Cinnamon, Cassia (also called Chinese Cinnamon) is often sold as Cinnamon in the U.S., where it’s preferred for its strong, spicy and lingering flavor.

Use in both sweet and strong savory dishes: candies, baked goods, meats, preserves, curries, and hot beverages. Cassia, with its intense aromatic qualities and taste, is the popular choice for Cinnamon Rolls.

Select options
Select options

Cloves

$9.25$25.00

Despite attempts at clove monopolies, by the 18th century cloves were grown in many places including Brazil, Tanzania, and Madagascar.  The whole Clove looks much like a nail, hence its French namesake, “clou” (nail).

Use in pastries, puddings, cooked fruits, and cakes, or sprinkle on oatmeal for a treat. Also yummy in stews and vegetables. Pairs well with nutmeg, cinnamon and ginger.

Select options
Select options

Fennel

$7.25$19.60

Used for hundreds of years, fennel has been credited by some to increase the flow of milk in nursing mothers and aiding diets by calming hungry stomachs.

Fennel is best added at the end of cooking to preserve its flavor.  Use in meat and vegetable dishes, starches and grains, sauces and herbed butter, salads, eggs, baked goods, and even beverages such as tea and wine.

Select options
Select options

Galangal

$8.50$23.00

While used for centuries as a culinary spice, Galangal root was also used in folk magic.  It was believed that chewing the root and spitting on the courtroom floor was the way to win a court case.

A relative of Ginger, Galangal has a strong citrus flavor with a peppery hot finish.  Use in Thai soups and curries.  It can also be finely chopped and pounded for use in pastes and teas.

Select options
Select options

Garlic

$8.50$27.00
(Based on 1 review)

Consumed by Greek athletic competitors, by Egyptian pyramid builders, and by Roman soldiers, garlic has historically been credited for providing strength and speed.

Sprinkle on bread with butter, and toast for a flavorful punch.  Or, when the texture of garlic is undesired, but the flavor a must, garlic powder is the solution, especially for sauces and recipes with liquid to absorb the powder.

Select options
Select options

Ginger

$9.25$25.00

Due to its appearance, Ginger was originally referred to as Horn Root. Versatile enough to use in both sweet and savory dishes, ginger is known for its spicy, sweet, and warm flavor.

Use in savory sauces, curries, chutney, and stir fry as well as in cookies, cakes and other desserts.   Often called for in Chinese, Caribbean and Japanese cuisine.

 

Recommended Recipes:

Hoisin Meatballs

Ginger Molasses Stars

Ginger Spice Cookies

Select options
Select options

Jin Yong ~ Cantonese- Style Blend

$10.25$27.70
(Based on 1 review)

Cantonese-style blend with moderate heat, sweet playful aromatics, and taste-bud-teasing Sichuan Pepper.  Pairs well with pork, veggies, and tofu.  Try in soups and stews for an extra treat.

 

Hand blended in small batches with: pepper, coriander, Sichuan pepper, cumin, Chiles, star anise, cardamom, and cinnamon.

Select options
Select options

Peppercorn, Sichuan

$10.50$28.35

A key ingredient in our Chinese Five Spice, Sichuan Peppercorns are also used in Nepali (Gurkha), Tibetan and Bhutanese cooking.  Chowmein in Nepal is often served with a Sichuan Pepper sauce. Sichuan has lemon overtones and causes a tingling of the mouth when eaten.

Great in stir fries, sauces & combined with Chiles in Chinese dishes.

Select options
Select options

Sesame Seeds, White

$7.25$19.60

Believed to be the first seasoning ever recorded, the Sesame Seed dates back to 3000 B.C.  According to legend, Sesame Seeds were brought to America by the African Slaves and quickly became popular with Southern cooking.

Use in breads and other baked goods, spreads, candies, soups, salads, fish & poultry dishes, and stir fried vegetables.

Select options
Outof stock
Select options

Star Anise

$8.10$21.75

This eight-point pod looks like a star, tastes like licorice, and is popular in Asian cuisine. Some Chinese chew the whole fruit as a breath freshener; the French and English use it to flavor liqueurs like Anisette and Pernod.

Use in Chinese cooking, Vietnamese noodle soup, Thailand iced black tea, and India curries.  Pairs well with meat and poultry dishes, soups, stocks, fruits and compotes.

Select options